Thursday, 6 July 2017

Photo 38

Thomas came home with his SATS results last night. He did really well and we're very proud of him. 

Unusually for a boy his marks for English, reading, spelling, grammar etc were higher than his maths. There wasn't much difference in the marks but I've always said I'd rather they were good at English because I think it's really hard to grasp that subject if it doesn't come naturally. 

With maths I tend to think as long as you can do the basics the rest is about memorising formulas etc. even if you need a bit of extra help doing it like Amy.

His results have given him a big confidence boost although we totally underplayed the whole SATS thing and he has it all weighed up really. Amy was a godsend as well. She told him not to bother about the marks too much because you spend the first fortnight in High School being re-tested anyway. 

The cut off mark for pass/fail was 100 and one of his friends got 99 in a subject so has failed. I think schools use terms such as 'not met required standard', but the pass/fail words are being used by the children so they may well be used in school. Thomas said the boy was really upset and didn't speak all day. I know Thomas would have felt for that boy missing out by just one mark. 

I hate that bloody F word. These are young children we're talking about aged 10/11 years old. Who needs a pass or fail label at that age. Just give them a mark and then put them in the relevant sets at High School. 

If anybody has children/grandchildren/nieces/nephews who have had their results then I hope they've done well. If they've not managed to meet the required mark then I really hope that they're not affected by it too much. And for any teachers and teaching assistants reading this I'm sure you've managed to convey to every child in your class that they're all stars in their own right.

I wonder what changes will take place yet again in our education system before this young lady reaches Y6. 

xxx




17 comments:

  1. As your daughter said they'll be retested throughout secondary school because children reach their potential at different times. Well done Thomas.

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    1. It's all a load of codswallop really isn't it at this age. I'm definitely not against exams it's just the way the children (and teachers) are put under so much pressure these days. Give me a good old fashioned report with percentages any day. I don't even know how they work it out. For example in the SPAG test they got a mark out of 70. Then it was converted to another mark out of 120. Under 100 was the fail. 100 and over was the pass. Talk about complicating matters. xx

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  2. Congratulations to Thomas! Are these exams similar to the old 11+? Thomas sounds like such a kind and caring young man. This is not the first time he has shown such empathy for one of his classmates. You must be doing something right!!

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    1. Thanks Janice. I have no idea if they're like the 11+. Was that something to do with whether you went to grammar school or not?

      These tests are taken by all children in Y6 and are the same across the country. A lot of parents don't like them because the normal reason a test is taken, ie to see how well a child is doing seems to have taken second place to the school league table. The higher the pass rate in a school the 'better' the school is deemed. Children, and teachers are put under a lot of pressure to perform for this reason.

      Thomas does have a high empathy level. I'm like that myself and I can always see 2 sides to every story. It's not a bad way to be but at times you can be taken advantage of. It's all about life lessons though isn't it. xx

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    2. Yes, 11+ was taken to determine whether you went to Grammar, Technical or Comprehensive school. I took it when I was 10, apparently I was a bit of a brainiac, at the time!!!lol. I went to N. Manchester Grammar School for Girls, up Moston Lane. I came to Canada at the end of my 4th year, so only had one year to go. When I got here, as I was only 14 I got put with my age, grade 10. That meant I had 3 more years to go, I was not impressed!!lol

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    3. I remember you saying you went to Manchester Grammar School. I don't think I'd have been very impressed with having another 3 years added on to my school life either although the adventure of moving to Canada might have eased my pain :) xx

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  3. Well done Thomas. There does seem to be too much focus on SATs these days. I didn't realise they could get a pass or fail, I just assumed they were graded differently. Too much pressure for little people!
    Even Lily gets assessed and each area of her development is given a level! I try not to take much notice of these numbers. X

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    1. In a way Jules I think so much emphasis has been put on sats that the tide is turning from a parental point of view. I know I played them down and told thomas they weren't going to define his life. I'm glad you try not to take too much notice of assessments. It can be hard but there really are more important things in life at their age. Xx

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  4. Congratulations, Thomas! Since I've no idea what Y6, etc. means, and the relevance of the test scores, I will simply wish him the best! Daughter had to sit for various assessment tests, too, as I recall. She usually took them all in stride and did well in them, so I didn't worry about them.

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  5. Thank you bless. Y6 is simply year 6, the last year of primary school before they move to high school. The relevance of any of it is debatable lol. Tests are part and parcel of education it's just the ridiculous emphasis put on Sats that's annoying. Xx

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    1. I see. Over here, elementary school is kindergarten and grades 1-5; middle school is grades 6-8; high school is grades 9-12. Daughter had various assessment tests she had to take in grades 2, 5, and 7, if I remember correctly. She had to take the PSAT (pre-SAT) in grades 9 and 10; then SAT in grade 11. This is a test administered throughout the States and the scores are generally required to apply for universities and colleges. (There is another test known as the ACT that some students take instead of the SAT). The SAT has been revised since when daughter took it - back then, it was scored on a scale of 600-2400 (the new SAT is from 400-1600). Daughter had to take some other test for the State graduation requirements, as well, in high school. I think I fretted more about her tests than she did!

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    2. There are so many tests in schools these days I don't know how anybody keeps up! I definitely think tests are necessary and I think under the right circumstances children can actually enjoy them - who doesn't like to know if they've made progress or not. But they way they go on about them as though at 11 years old it'll be the make or break of you for life is just plain ridiculous. xx

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  6. What a lovely young man Thomas is.....and well done indeed on those SAT's.
    I don't know if Ruby has had her results yet. I'll ask tomorrow when I see the family.
    Hugs-x-

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    1. Thank you Sheila. There was talk of KS1 not doing SATS any more but I guess that never happened if Ruby has taken them. They seem to be more for the schools these days than the children and I don't think it will be long before parents and children don't give them a second thought or get so worked up about them because of this ....and quite rightly so. xx

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  7. Well done Thomas!
    I didn't even know the results were in. Violet was at HS again yesterday, so I imagine she'll find out her results today. Crumbs. I hope she's done well. you are spot on, children don't need to hear that they are 'fails' at this age. Honestly, if we spent more time boosting confidence than finding fault, we'd end up with a nation of high achievers!

    Yes. Makes you wonder what it'll be like for Sienna in years to come. How much extra stress and hassle will she have? :o(
    xx

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  8. oh I am so annoyed. School have got the results but are not telling the children until Monday. How dare they?! All that grief and stress they ladled on before and during, now they act as if it's none of their business! I'm so angry about it. Am so pleased the days are numbered there. xx

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    1. Thanks Sadie, I'm glad they're over and he 'passed'. As much as it really wouldn't bother me either way I know it would have bothered Thomas which is why I feel for the children who didn't achieve that 'golden' 100.

      Thomas didn't come home with anything official. They were all called up individually to the teachers - they have different ones for maths and English and given their results which were handwritten on a sticky label.

      I think it's really mean of the teachers to keep the results back. We had to wait a couple of days for Amy's. I was working in school at the time so I knew how she'd done but I was sworn to secrecy because obviously kids blab and they didn't want Amy telling her friends when they'd not got theirs. The Head and the Y6 teachers were inputting them onto some league table or other, then they were printed off, addressed to the parent/carer and handed out. I was more than happy that they told Thomas first, after all he put the work in and the crumpled sticky label that had been in his pocket all day for us was fine - at least we know. Prolonging it, especially over a weekend, is mean. xx

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