Wednesday, 7 June 2017

Photo 8

Thomas wanted to make slime last night. He showed me the video and it looked pretty easy plus all you needed was washing up liquid and cornflour which I had. Even though my kitchen was spotless I thought, well at least he's not on the Xbox, so I said OK. After 5 minutes I had to come away, the gloop that was flying around and being dropped on the floor was too much for me to bear but I didn't want to spoil his fun.

When he'd finished the kitchen looked like a bomb had hit it and all he had to show for the mess were 3 small balls of gloop. When I asked him why he didn't put all the balls together to make a big one he told me "I'm selling them at school tomorrow, there's a black market for slime and balls are going for £1". 

If he'd told me about the black market before he'd started I'd have saved myself a load of mess and bought him a packet of chocolate bars. They're banned at school and I'm sure there'd be a BIG black market for them.

It got me thinking about what we used to sell at school to make a bit of cash although I can't actually remember selling anything, because being a goody two shoes I earned my money by babysitting. However, back in the day when they were cheap enough to give away and age/health wasn't an issue, Mark would hang around the shopping centre on Saturdays asking people for a cigarette until he'd collected enough to sell on to his mates at school the following week.  

And Amy once took a bag of lollipops into school to sell. She paid 70p for them and came home with 60p - rofl. Told you maths wasn't her thing. 

In the end Thomas didn't take the slime. I think he got cold feet about being caught with it.  

Thankfully he used all the cornflour up last night and I 'forgot' to buy any more at Bury. Hopefully this little money making venture is over. 


         
Did any of you have money making schemes when you were at school? 

xxx





17 comments:

  1. I don't remember any money making schemes at school. I do remember collections of things and doing swaps. My favourites were rubbers. Do you remember all the different shapes? The scented ones were my favourites. I don't even know if you can still get them.
    I hope you managed to get your kitchen ship shape once again. X

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    1. I can't even remember doing swaps Jules but Amy was always taking Pokemon cards into primary and Thomas has been involved in football cards, until both were banned - it caused too much arguing I think and I suspect teachers got fed up of sorting arguments out.

      I do remember my group of friends all taking elastics in so that we could play that game - do you remember it? - I loved it. Any my brother used to trade marbles - I'm sounding really old now haha.

      You can definitely get different shaped rubbers but not sure if you can buy scented ones - they sound nice though.

      It looked like ghostbusters had zapped a green ghoulie when I went in the kitchen. The mop and bucket had to come out, that's how bad it was! xx

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    2. I loved the elastic game, I would use two heavy chairs at home if no one was about to hold it for me.

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    3. I used to do that as well Tania! I remember the elastics starting at the ankle, then moving to the shin, knee, thigh, waist and under your arms. Great fun. xx

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  2. When I lived in Liverpool my mother worked for Vernons pools and she would bring home elastic bands. We would chain these together making the large elastic for the game, if you can remember. I would swap the bands for food, usually biscuits.

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    1. I loved elastics and can remember two different sets of jumping we did. I also loved skipping especially with a big rope where we'd all line up and jump in to the letters of the alphabet or a ditty that I can't remember but it involved pushing the jumper out (in a nice way), so you could start your turn. Ah they were fun times. xx

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  3. And how long did it take Thomas to clear up? ( Ha!)

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  4. His job was to create the mess, sue. Mine was to clear it up. Although to be fair he'd have just spread it all round the kitchen so much quicker for me to do it. But we are not making slime again any time soon. Xx

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    1. I sent him upstairs with amy to get cleaned up. That was one job too much for me haha. X

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  5. This is a hilarious post!! All of it has had me laughing my big fat ass off!! Was roaring by the end! Poor Amy with her failed lollipop venture! Thomas talking about the black market at school - hilarious!! Shady dealings going on. The mess though reminds me of the time we made salt dough at night owls. We put it in a tub and somehow forgot about it. The tub can't have been airtight though and natural yeast spores must have got in it. Two of the naughty boy types had then gone to the cupboard a few weeks later and struggled to get the tub off the. Shelf as it was so heavy, the lid came off and the salt dough had somhow quadrupled in size, was rank and omg sticky.... the naughty boys discovered the great splatty noise it made when you plunged your hands into it. And had a throw it at each other game. We could not stop laughing ( after we'd bollocked them of course ) and made them clean it up, but that stench and stickiness means I'm never ever ever making salt dough again!
    But I'm not sure I should confess about my childhood moneymaking scheme. It's quite alarming!

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  6. You wouldn't be laughing if you were on gloop cleaning duty! I asked Amy if she'd eaten any lollies herself which would have made it better but she said no, how she got that C in her GCSE I'll never know.

    The salt dough saga sounds horrendous but I bet those boys will always remember finding it and the fun they had. We made it at after school club once, never again. The bloody stuff was everywhere.

    I used to be so impressed at how teachers would tell children off and have them quaking in their shoes, then as soon as they'd sent them on their way, break down in laughter. I'm rubbish at telling off - the sound of me trying to be grown up makes me giggle and I lose all credibility. Good job Amy and Thomas are basically good or they'd be running wild.

    Oh, you cannot leave me in suspenders about the money making scheme. As long as it didn't take place behind the bike shed it can't possibly be that bad :) xx

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    1. Ok....
      Me and my bestest friend in the world at the time Elizabeth Brown ( ace name ) were about 8. Round the corner from her house was a large estate of old people bungalows. We knocked a few doors and offered to do little jobs for money as we were raising money for the brownies. We got 5-20p here and there for washing up, walking dogs, weeding etc. We were lovely little girls and the old dears loved us.

      Only, despite being in the brownies ( my own mother was Tawny Owl ), all of our hard earned pennies were spent at the 'top ' shop on sweets!! Which we bought by the bagful and ate them sat on the side of the canal that we were never supposed to go to, with our feet in the water. We never ever paddled though because the fear of drowning from Ginny green teeth was too great!
      Life was so much freeer in the 1970s.

      Bet you never had me down for extortion!!!!

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    2. Wow, real life racketeering at 8 years old - go you! At least you did some jobs in return for the cash you extorted, even if the old dears were under the impression you were collecting for brownies. I can just imagine you both hot footing it to the shops to buy your loot and then stuffing yourselves silly with E's.

      We lived near a canal as well and if you were wagging school that's where you generally headed, under bridge where you'd spend the afternoon smoking yourself silly. Not that I did, but it was a regular haunt for my brother. He used to go fishing there as well and once went with his broken arm in plaster. A lad rode past him on a bike and pushed him in. God knows how he didn't drown with the weight of the cast. I can remember him now standing at the front door dripping wet with weeds attached to him holding his fishing rod and box of maggots.

      I remember ginny green teeth - she was our threat if we didn't brush our teeth.

      Yes, life was much more relaxed in the 70's. A great era to grow up in. xx

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  7. OMG I'm amazed he didn't drown - Ginny Green Teeth round our way lived under the water in the canal and shed wrap her hair ( the duck weeds ) round your ankles and pull you down to your doooooooom!
    I do remember the shop keeper once asking us why we had so much money ( prolly about a pound !!! )

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    1. Ginny Green teeth was definitely teeth related in our house and the other saying was if you don't wash behind your ears you'll have spuds growing out of them. I remember finding 50p once with my friend. We split it and flipping heck it didn't half buy us a load of stuff each. Proper big bars of chocolate as well as a good few rounds of the penny tray. If you had £1 he probably thought you'd robbed a bank! xx

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  8. I never tried any money making scams at school. Feeling really dull and like I've missed out in some way now! x

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    1. You were obviously a good girl like me Sadie. I had a paper round and babysat for my money. Unlike other bloggers we associate with who con dear old ladies out of their money on the pretext of collecting for the Brownies, mentioning no names Rachel at Eternally 28 :) xx

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